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QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE

Q:

What is your main objective in your productions?

A:

If an artist has a clear picture of what they want it's my job to see it through and if they are on the right path just stay out of the way. One other thing I find to be really important is a comfortable atmosphere. I'm good with reading people and creating the best vibe to enhance the creative process.

Q:

Now here is the hard one to answer but always asked. What are your weaknesses?

A:

Probably assuming that everbody has the same mentality and morality that I do. Sometimes I can lose site of that.

Q:

What was it like working with 2Pac?

Q:

How do you approach a mix?

A:

It's about the song and it's about reading the artist. In the case of Jason Mraz I knew he comes from a very honest and organic place. But also he is a classically trained musician, so fidelity is important.

A:

It was an expierence I will never forget. He was an extremely talented and intelligent man. Respect was something he gave when deserved.

Q:

How did you survive Death Row Records?

Q:

When recording ADR for Games and Anime. What contributions do you make?

A:

I Pride myself on keeping the session mood very light and fun. I pay close attention to continuity. A lot of times things are moving at such a fast pace that things can sometimes be overlooked. MOST IMPORTANT

"ALWAYS BE IN RECORD"

A:

I wonder that myself and get that question all the time. When you want something so bad you will endure anything to get it. I wanted to be a engineer and I wasn't going to fail in my quest. I went through things that you couldn't imagine.

Q:

How did you get into being a freelance engineer?

Q:

What experience do you have in supervising audio?

A:

Over the course of 20 plus years I have many times found myself in the lead position of a project. Putting together a great team that I can trust and implementing a efficient work flow to maintain both deadlines and quality.

A:

Cultivating relationships is a good 75% of being a good engineer. A person can have all the technical know how but not have the personality for it. I have gotten gigs just on my personality with a hope that I had skill to back it up. Fortunately I did and that's how you become freelance.

Q:

Q:

What is your favorite part of the process of audio work?

A:

I love to track drums. Pretty much all tracking. I like it because I get to be a part of a family of creative people. I say family because that is what it's like when you work so close together.

Where do you see yourself in the future of audio?

A:

I would like to see myself in a position that I can be creative and share my knowledge but also have a check on Friday. Music is my passion and always will be. Whether I am doing it full time or for fun. It will always be there. I get calls to book all kinds of gigs now and I never know what it's going to be. Mixing TV, ADR, Music, Production, supervising. You never know what the job is going to be.

Q:

What is your biggest strength?

A:

Being versatile is what makes me relevant and working. If it makes noise I can record it. If it doesn't exist I can make it. And if it's already recorded I can mix the hell out of it.

Q:

What was your first job in audio.

A:

I started out in 1993 after attending Sound Master Recording School at the famed Sound City Studios as a runner. It is crucial to start at that level. It is humbling and you have to prove to yourself and others that you are worthy to learn this craft which led to assisting on many classic albums of the 90's. I had a few great Engineers and Producers mentor me during that time. The likes of Joe Barresi and GGarth Richardson, Rick Rubin, and Sylvia Massey. Trully blessed to be a part of the Sound City Alum.

Q:

Do you have any engineers or mixers that you still look up to?

A:

Of course. Joe Barresi is by far my favorite. He is a good friend but I would hear an album that had amazing guitars on it or something and I could always pick out his projects. Working with him, he thinks out of the box and is always trying interesting ways of getting sounds.

Mixing would be the obvious Chris Lord Algae. The energy he puts into a mix is amazeballs. That is a word now. With still so much clarity and depth I strive to mix with his elements in mind.